Life After Coming Out by CNN Motion

Mark Tedesco joined a seminary in Rome when he was a teenager. Halfway through his education, he began to confront feelings he’d had for much of his life — feelings he wasn’t sure how to reconcile with his faith.

Art director Ignacio Osorio and the team at CNN Motion apply a gentle, compassionate touch to the story of Mark Tedesco, a young priest trying to reconcile his faith and sexuality in the latest episode of CNN’s “Life After” series.

CNN Motion

WALL-E by Pixar Animation Studios

WALL·E) is a 2008 American computer-animated science fiction romance film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures. It was directed and co-written by Andrew Stanton.

WALL-E follows a solitary trash compactor robot on a future, uninhabitable, deserted Earth, left to clean up garbage. However, he is visited by a probe sent by the starship Axiom, a robot called EVE, with whom he falls in love and pursues across the galaxy.

WALL-E  (2008) | Behind the scenes

Sous la glace by Baulard, Berrahma, Dupont, Estampes, Nory & Potin

An allegory about the dangers of following your deepest instincts, “Sous la Glace” (Under the Ice), a CG short film by six students at École des Nouvelles Images comes wrapped in the most sublime digital cinematography.

Directed by Milan Baulard, Ismail Berrahma, Flore Dupont, Laurie Estampes, Quentin Nory, Hugo Potin with music composed by Baptiste Leblanc.

1917 by Roger Deakins and Sam Mendes

April 6th, 1917. As a regiment assembles to wage war deep in enemy territory, two soldiers are assigned to race against time and deliver a message that will stop 1,600 men from walking straight into a deadly trap.

Golden Globe-winning “1917” is a serious Oscar contender. It stars George MacKay, Dean-Charles Chapman, Colin Firth, and Benedict Cumberbatch and was filmed to look like one continuous shot. Cinematographer Roger Deakins explains how he and director Sam Mendes did it, from digging up a mile of trenches to attaching cameras to cranes and drones.

More one shots:
Atonement by Joe Wright
Boogie Nights by Pault Thomas Anderson
Touch of Evil by Orson Welles

Duck Amuck by Chuck Jones

Duck Amuck is an American animated cartoon short directed by Chuck Jones and produced by Warner Bros. Cartoons. The short film was released in early 1953 by The Vitaphone Corporation, the short subject division of Warner Bros., as part of the Merrie Melodies series. It stars Daffy Duck, who is tormented by a seemingly sadistic, unseen animator, who constantly changes Daffy’s locations, clothing, voice, physical appearance and even shape, much to Daffy’s aggravation and rage. Pandemonium reigns throughout the cartoon as Daffy attempts to steer the action back to some kind of normality, only for the animator to either ignore him or, more frequently, to over-literally interpret his increasingly frantic demands. In the end, the tormenting animator is revealed to be Bugs Bunny.